USS Noor Inayat Khan LCARS Database Muari

Muari

From USS Noor Inayat Khan LCARS Database


Collectively, they are called the Muari (translated in common as 'the People'). All outworlders are called Ne'Muari (translated in common as 'not the people").

The tribe itself was divided into three castes:

  • Amrazi: Artisans and caregivers, the gentle Amrazi, who dressed in blue robes, were considered to be the heart of the tribe. As such, they were very nearly as well protected as the Imai herself. The Amrazi were never seen by outworlders or members of other tribes; and yet, within their own tribe, they were very much at the center of daily life. It was the Amrazi who set up the tents, raised the children, made sure that meals were served, and gave comfort and care to those who had need. While skilled, the Amrazi were not permitted to learn how to read or write.
  • Moaku: Historians and scientists, permitted to know many of the tribe's mysteries and secrets, the Moaku, who dressed in golden robes, guarded their domain from all but the Imai. At one time, the Moaku were storytellers who shared what they could of the tribe's history around the nightly campfire. Over time, however, the caste chose voluntary segregation from the day-to-day life of the tribe. Like the Amrazi, the Moaku were never seen by outworlders though this was more of their own preference than by command of the Imai. All Moaku know how to read and write. Moaku remain celebate throughout their lives.
  • Azhadi: Warriors, the Azhadi are described in many ways -- the stars that shone bright though briefly and the outward-turned face, among others. Dressed entirely in black, the Azhadi serve the Imai's will. Taken into the caste as children, training is long and arduous. Azhadi warriors are extreme runners who can run literally from sunrise to sunset. They are trained in hand-to-hand combat and with the use of bladed weapons. Distance weapons are considered cowardly; Azhadi warriors are taught to fight within reach of their own death. Every Azhadi must undergo and pass a series of trials before being accepted as a warrior of the caste. One of these trials is the creation of a longsword and dagger which are the only things an Azhadi carries. Those who fail the trials return to the Amrazi caste. Azhadi own nothing except their weapons nor do they desire possessions. For an Azhadi, service is enough though, when the service is exceptional, the Imai may award an individual with a Je'tai (metal object usually in the shape of something familiar). The Azhadi wear their hair long with thin braids on either side; the Je'tai are attached to these braids. They carry their sword and dagger with them always. Dressed entirely in black, robes, pants, and soft boots, with their faces covered, the Azhadi are the ones who meet outworlders. They are masters of edged weapons, hand-to-hand combat, and when in service, the weapons they use as mercenaries (while in service).  While the Azhadi obey without question, it is also true that rather than commit what they consider to be a dishonorable act, an individual Azhadi will choose to commit suicide.  
  • Head of the Tribe - the Imai: Always female, in modern practice the Imai comes from the Moaku caste though, in centuries past, an Azhadi was sometimes chosen. The Imai is the only member of the tribe that is permitted to sit on a chair or a stool. The Imai is guarded by Azhadi warriors. If dishonored in any way or worse, threatened, the Azhadi act immediately usually by killing the offender outright. In her presence, one makes eye contact or speaks only when permitted to do so by the Imai. One must speak deferentially and quietly, with great respect. Outworlders may not bring weapons into her presence. The Imai can order an Azhadi to forget everything he or she knows.

Culture

Meeting Other Tribes

If two tribes meet and it is the will of either Imai, the First among the Azhadi for each tribe meet in combat to the death. For the losers, the Imai commits suicide and her children are absorbed into the winner's tribe. While such meetings were at one time infrequent, they became more common and usually included combat.

Service

Azhadi can be sent into service, usually contracts undertaken with outworlders with terms dictated by the Imai. The Azhadi are relentless warriors who learn the technology of those they serve as well as their language. They live in an edun, separate from the aliens they serve, on neutral ground and will give everything they have toward completion of the contract, even if the contract takes generations to complete.

Marriage/Children

There is no concept of marriage among the Muari. The Azhadi take comfort in the blankets of the Amrazi at night. Children of such matings belong to the tribe. Fatherhood is an honorary title and most children have many fathers. Fierce in combat, at night around the home fires, the Azhadi laugh easily and long and they are always willing to play with the children. They live entirely in the moment, knowing that their lives could end at any moment. No Azhadi expects to live to old age.

The Mysteries

Every tribe has a screened area behind which are held 'the mysteries'. When a warrior dies, he lays for one night in front of the screened area, the closest he will ever get to the mysteries. In fact, only the Imai and the Moaku have any idea what lies behind the screen. For anyone else to enter that area is a death sentence.

Shon'ai

A game played by tribal members. The Amrazi play with smooth, rounded black stones. The Azhadi play with their knives. A chant begins and each member of the circle tosses a stone or knife on the beat and receives one at the same time. A skilled player can sit in a circle of ten and come away without injury. An Azhadi learns the game using metal rods and over time will graduate to using knives. One can be injured playing Shon'ai even fatally so; you cast and receive your fate with each throw.

Dictionary

Edun: A group of Azhadi sent into service are called an edun. The edun is established on neutral ground according to terms agreed upon in the contract. For long-term contracts, especially those that require generations to complete, the edun also includes Moaku, Amrazi, and an Imai.

Muari: Their word for the people. You are either Muari (the people) or Ne’Muari (not the people or outworlder). Note that the Muari speak two languages -- common and high speech. While common can be learned by outworlders, the high speech is forbidden to all but the Muari themselves.

Ne’Muari: How the Muari describe outworlders/strangers.

Imai: tribal leader and spiritual mother to the tribe, her word is law.

Shon'ai: A game played by tribal members. The Amrazi play with smooth, rounded black stones. The Azhadi play with their knives. A chant begins and each member of the circle tosses a stone or knife on the beat and receives one at the same time. A skilled player can sit in a circle of ten and come away without injury. An Azhadi learns the game using metal rods and over time will graduate to using knives. One can be injured playing Shon'ai even fatally so; you cast and receive your fate with each throw.

La Mallumo: Literally, the dark. Refers to a period of travel between worlds. During that time, the people forget all that they knew about the world they left and start over afresh on the new world.

Culture/Taboos

  • The people believe in living a natural life. Technology, while used while in service and known to the Moaku as part of the secrets they keep, is not part of everyday life. The people live in tents and cook over open fires. They do not ride animals or travel in conveyances nor do they use chairs or raised beds.
  • The people prefer natural remedies. It is considered a terrible fate for one of the people to be placed on life support or kept alive through the use of technology.